(vasep.com.vn) In 2020, the Covid-19 pandemic spread out all over the world that had a tremendous impact on the world tuna industry in general and the Vietnamese tuna industry in particular. Despite the difficulties, Vietnamese tuna processing and exporting enterprises have still been making efforts to overcome drawbacks.

In order to meet state management and market requirements, the Directorate of Fisheries (Ministry of Agriculture and Rural Development of Vietnam) is implementing software and piloting of electronic traceability in seafood supply chain.

With the average seafood import demand of 4.1-4.5 billion USD/year, Vietnam seafood has great room to increase exports to the UK market thanks to the push from the UKVFTA Free Trade Agreement.

The Viet Nam Association of Seafood Exporters and Producers said it plans several measures to help its members further penetrate the global supply chain and enable the fisheries sector to reach its export target of US$12 billion in 2025, 40 per cent higher than this year.

Phung Duc Tien, Deputy Minister of Agriculture and Rural Development speaks to Vietnam Agriculture Newspaper about strategies to preserve and develop sustainable aquatic resources.

(seafood.vasep.com.vn) In order to contribute to raising awareness of seafood processing enterprises, fishing vessel owners and the fishing community about the importance and principles of not using child labor, prevention of illegal, unreported and unregulated fishing (IUU), towards building sustainable fisheries, VASEP has cooperated with the Directorate of Fisheries (Ministry of Agriculture and Rural Development) and International Labor Organization in Vietnam (ILO Vietnam) carrying out many propaganda activities.

The Aquaculture Stewardship Council (ASC) is updating its variance requests (VR) process, a move that will give shareholders and NGOs the opportunity to contribute to decisions on local variances to the ASC standards.

Removing the European Commission (EC)’s illegal, unreported and unregulated (IUU) fishing “yellow card” is not easy and cannot be done overnight, but the Vietnamese business community and associations are still determined to do, not only to meet EU requirements, but also for the sake of sustainable fishery development.

Vietnam aims to develop its fisheries sector into a large commodity production industry with competitive capacity and responsible and sustainable integration in line with international institutions, contributing to improving incomes for industry workers.

Vice Chairman of the Spanish Chamber of Commerce in Vietnam Rubén Saornil Mínguez recently appreciated efforts by the Vietnamese Government, businesses and fishermen in fighting illegal, unreported and unregulated (IUU) fishing following the European Commission (EC)’s recommendations.

Fishermen in south-central Khanh Hoa province have begun to apply technology in fishing over recent years and posted remarkable results in terms of catches and earnings. Modern technology has helped them improve their standard of living while also protecting national sovereignty at sea.

The Mekong Delta province of Kien Giang will spend about 80.3 trillion VND (3.45 billion USD) on promoting safe, sustainable and effective agricultural production in the 2021-2025 period, according to the provincial Department of Agriculture and Rural Development.

Trade between Vietnam and China has produced positive results, despite long-lasting difficulties caused by the COVID-19 pandemic, with Vietnam affirming its position as China’s largest trade partner in ASEAN.

Vietnam has been taking various measures across its provinces in order to fight IUU fishing so that it can have the yellow card that it still holds from the EU removed.

Fish catches are gradually recovering after the COVID-19 outbreak in central provinces, according to local fishermen.